Thursday, July 30, 2015

Check out What Sauron is saying about Oracle

Over past year we have been (hopefully) hearing about Oracle Big Data SQL.

This is a new(-ish) option from Oracle that allows us to run our SQL queries not just on the data in our Oracle Database but also against NoSQL databases and Hadoop. No extra coding is needed, no extra formatting is needed, etc.

All the hard work in connecting to the data in this systems, translating it into executable code on these systems, executing it, capturing the results and presenting the results back to us sitting in our schema in our Oracle Database.

How cool is that.

To learn more about Oracle Big Data SQL check out their webpage.

But what let us get back to the title of this blog post, 'What Sauron is saying about Oracle'. I used these back at one of my presentation at BIWA Summit in January 2015 and I've been meaning to post these since.

If you have read books or watch the movies you will remember the phrase.

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We can apply this phrase to Oracle SQL now.

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or maybe my alternative version might be better.

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Tuesday, July 28, 2015

Charting Number of R Packages over time (Part 3)

This is the third and final blog post on analysing the number of new R packages that have been submitted over time.

Check out the previous blog posts:

  • Blog Post 1 : Getting, some basic analysis and graph
  • Blog Post 2 : Aggregating the data and create a number of more useful graphs.

In this blog post I will show you how you can perform Forecasting on our data to make some predictions on the possible number of new packages over the next 12 months.

There are 2 important points to note here:

  1. Only time will tell if these predictions are correct or nearly connect. Just like with any other prediction techniques.
  2. You cannot use just one of the Forecasting techniques in isolation to make a prediction. You need to use a number of functions/algorithms to see which one suits your data best.

The second point above is very important with all prediction techniques. Sometimes you see people/articles talking about them only using algorithm X. They have not considered any of the other techniques/algorithms. It is their favourite or preferred method. But that does not mean it works or is suitable for all data sets and all scenarios.

In this blog post I'm going to use 3 different forecasting functions, the in-build Forecast function in R, using HoltWinters and finally using ARIMA. Yes there are many more (it is R after all) and I'll leave these for you to explore.

1. Convert data set to Time Series data format

The first thing I need to do is to convert the data I want analyze into TimeSeries format (ts). This looks to have one record or instance for each data point.

So you cannot not have any missing data, or in my case any missing dates. Yes (for my data set) we could have some months where we do not have any submissions. What I could do is to work out mean values (or things like that) and fill for the missing months. But I'm feeling a bit lazy and after examining the data I see that we have a continuous set of data from September 2009 onwards. This is fine as most of the growth up to that point is flat.

So I need to subset the data to only include cases greater than or equal to September 2009 and less than or equal to June 2015. I wanted to explore July 2015 as the number for this month is incomplete.

The following code builds on the work we did in the second blog post in the series

library(forecast)
library(ggplot2)

# Subset the data
sub_data <- subset(data.sum, Group.date >= as.Date("2009-08-01", "%Y-%m-%d"))
sub_data <- subset(sub_data, Group.date <= as.Date("2015-06-01", "%Y-%m-%d"))

# Subset again to only take out the data we want to use in the time series
sub_data2 <- sub_data[,c("R_NUM")]

# Create the time series data, stating that it is monthly (12) and giving the start and end dates
ts_data <- ts(sub_data2, frequency=12, start=c(2009, 8), end=c(2015, 6))

# View the time series data
ts_data
     Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2009                               2   3   4   3   4
2010   5   5   1  11   5   2   5   4   4   5   1   3
2011  11   4   3   6   6   5   9  15   5   8  23  18
2012  33  17  51  28  37  33  50  71  41 231  51  60
2013  75  67  76  81  76  74  77  89 111  96 111 200
2014 155 129 175 140 145 133 155 207 232 162 229 310
2015 308 343 332 378 418 558    

We now have the data prepared for input to our Forecasting functions in R.

2. Using Forecast in R

For the Forecast function all you need to do is pass in the Time Series dataset and tell the function how my steps into the future you want it to predict. In all my examples I'll ask the functions to predict for the next 12 months.

ts_forecast <- forecast(ts_data, h=12)
ts_forecast

         Point Forecast     Lo 80     Hi 80 Lo 95     Hi 95
Jul 2015       447.1965  95.67066  784.3163     0  958.6669
Aug 2015       499.4344 115.94329  873.1822     0 1069.8689
Sep 2015       551.7875 123.88426  952.0773     0 1230.4707
Oct 2015       603.7212 156.89486 1078.0395     0 1370.2069
Nov 2015       654.7647 143.29718 1179.4903     0 1603.8335
Dec 2015       704.5162 135.76829 1352.8925     0 1844.7230
Jan 2016       752.6447 151.09936 1502.6088     0 2100.9708
Feb 2016       798.8877 156.37383 1652.0847     0 2575.3715
Mar 2016       843.0474 159.67095 1848.1703     0 2888.1738
Apr 2016       884.9849 154.59456 2061.7990     0 3281.6062
May 2016       924.6136 148.04651 2325.9060     0 3891.5064
Jun 2016       961.8922 138.67935 2531.7578     0 4395.6033

plot(ts_forecast)

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For this we get a very large range of values and very wide predictive intervals. If we limit the y axis we can get a better picture of the actual predictions.

plot(ts_forecast, ylim=range(0:1000))
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3. Using HoltWinters

For HoltWinters we can use the in-built R function for this. All we need to do is to pass in the Time Series data set. The first part we can plot the HoltWinters for the existing data set

?HoltWinters
hw <- HoltWinters(ts_data)
plot(hw)
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Now we want to predict for the next 12 months

forecast <- predict(hw, n.ahead = 12, prediction.interval = T, level = 0.95)
forecast

              fit       upr      lwr
Jul 2015 519.9304  599.8097 440.0512
Aug 2015 560.1083  648.4183 471.7983
Sep 2015 601.4528  701.0163 501.8892
Oct 2015 643.9639  757.3750 530.5529
Nov 2015 681.5168  811.0727 551.9608
Dec 2015 724.7363  872.4508 577.0218
Jan 2016 773.8308  941.4768 606.1848
Feb 2016 809.8836  999.0401 620.7272
Mar 2016 847.1448 1059.2371 635.0525
Apr 2016 898.4476 1134.7795 662.1158
May 2016 933.8755 1195.6532 672.0977
Jun 2016 972.3866 1260.7376 684.0356

plot(hw, forecast)
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4. Using ARIMA

For ARIMA we need to perform a simple conversion of the Time Series data into ARIMA format and then perform the forecase

fc_arima <- auto.arima(ts_data)
fc_fc_arima  <- forecast(fc_arima, h=12)
fc_fc_arima

         Point Forecast    Lo 80     Hi 80    Lo 95     Hi 95
Jul 2015       524.4758 476.2203  572.7314 450.6753  598.2764
Aug 2015       567.1156 513.2301  621.0012 484.7048  649.5265
Sep 2015       609.7554 548.3239  671.1869 515.8041  703.7068
Oct 2015       652.3952 581.6843  723.1062 544.2522  760.5383
Nov 2015       695.0350 613.5293  776.5408 570.3828  819.6873
Dec 2015       737.6748 644.0577  831.2920 594.4998  880.8499
Jan 2016       780.3147 673.4319  887.1974 616.8516  943.7777
Feb 2016       822.9545 701.7797  944.1292 637.6337 1008.2752
Mar 2016       865.5943 729.2004 1001.9881 656.9978 1074.1907
Apr 2016       908.2341 755.7718 1060.6963 675.0631 1141.4050
May 2016       950.8739 781.5559 1120.1918 691.9244 1209.8233
Jun 2016       993.5137 806.6027 1180.4246 707.6581 1279.3693

plot(fc_fc_arima, ylim=range(0:800))
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As you can see there are very different results from each of these forecasting techniques. If this was a real life project on real data then we would go about exploring a lot more of the Forecasting function available in R. The reason for this is to identify which R function and Forecasting algorithm works best for our data.

Which Forecasting technique would you choose from the selection above?

But will this function and algorithm always work with our data? The answer is NO. As our data evolves so may the algorithm that works best for our data. This is why the data science/analytics world is iterative. We need to recheck/revalidate the functions/algorithms to see if we need to start using something else or not. When we do need to use another function/algorithm you need to ask yourself why this has happened, what has changed in the data, what has changed in the business, etc.

Wednesday, July 22, 2015

Charting Number of R Packages over time (Part 2)

This is the second blog post on charting the number of new R Packages over time.

Check out the first blog post that looked at getting the data, performing some simple graphing and then researching some issues that were identified using the graph.

In this blog post I will look at how you can aggregate the data, plot it, get a regression line, then plot it using ggplot2 and we will include a trend line using the geom_smooth.

1. Prepare the data

In my previous post we extracted and aggregated the data on a daily bases. This is the plot that was shown in my previous post. This gives us a very low level graph and perhaps we might get something a little bit more useable is we aggregated the data. I have the data in an Oracle Database so it would be easy for me to write another query to perform the necessary aggregation. But let's make things a little bit trickier. I'm going to use R to do the aggregation.

Our data set is in the data frame called data. What I want to do is to aggregate it up to monthly level. The first thing I did was to create a new column that contains the values of the new aggregate level.

data$R_MONTH <- format(rdate2, "%Y%m01")
data$R_MONTH <- as.Date(data$R_MONTH3, "%Y%m%d")
data.sum <- aggregate(x = data[c("R_NUM")],
                    FUN = sum,
                    by = list(Group.date = data$R_MONTH)
)

2. Plot the Data

We now have the data aggregated at monthly level. We can now plot the graph. Ignore the last data point on the chart. This is for July 2015 and I extracted the data on the 9th of July. So we do not have a full months of data here.

plot(as.Date(data.sum$Group.date), data.sum$R_NUM, type="b", xaxt="n", cex=0.75 , ylab="Num New Packages", main="Number of New Packages by Month")
axis(1, as.Date(data.sum$Group.date, "%Y-%d"), as.Date(data.sum$Group.date, "%Y-%d"), cex.axis=0.5, las=1)

This gives us the following graph.

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3. Plot the data using ggplot2

The basic plot function of R is great and allows us to quickly and easily get some good graphs produced. But it is a bit limited and perhaps we want to create something that is a bit more elaborate. ggplot2 is a very popular package that can allow us to create a graph, building it up in a number of steps and layers to give something that is a lot more professional.

In the following example I've kept things simple and Yes I could have done so much more. I'll leave that as an exercise for you go off an do.

The first step is to use the qplot function to produce a basic plot using ggplot2. This gives us something similar to what we got from the plot function.

library(ggplot2)
qplot(x=factor(data.sum$Group.date), y=data.sum$R_NUM, data=data.sum, 
       xlab="Year/Month", ylab='Num of New Packages', asp=0.5)

This gives us the following graph.

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Now if we use ggplot2 then we need to specify a lot more information. Here is the equivalent plot using ggplot2 (with a line plot).

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4. Include a trend line

We can very easily include a trend line in a ggplot2 graph using the geom_smooth command. In the following example we have the same chart and include a linear regression line.

plt <- ggplot(data.sum, aes(x=factor(data.sum$Group.date), y=data.sum$R_NUM)) + geom_line(aes(group=1)) +
  theme(text = element_text(size=7),
        axis.text.x = element_text(angle=90, vjust=1)) + xlab("Year / Month") + ylab("Num of New Packages") +
  geom_smooth(method='lm', se=TRUE, size = 0.75, fullrange=TRUE, aes(group=20))
plt

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We can tell a lot from this regression plot.

But perhaps we would like to see a trend line on the chart, with something like a moving averages plot. Plus I've added in a bit of scaling to help with representing the data at a monthly level.

library(scales)
plt <- ggplot(data.sum, aes(x=as.POSIXct(data.sum$Group.date), y=data.sum$R_NUM)) + geom_line() + geom_point() +
  theme(text = element_text(size=12),
        axis.text.x = element_text(angle=90, vjust=1)) + xlab("Year / Month") + ylab("Num of New Packages") +
  geom_smooth(method='loess', se=TRUE, size = 0.75, fullrange=TRUE) +
  scale_x_datetime(breaks = date_breaks("months"), labels = date_format("%b"))
plt
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In the third blog post on this topic (link coming soon) I will look at how we can use some of the forecasting and predicting functions available in R. We can use these to see help us visualize what the future growth patterns might be for this data. I have some interesting things to show.

Monday, July 20, 2015

the R Consortium

On the 30th June (2015) a number of companies came together to form the R Consortium. The aim of the R Consortium is to support the R community and to help it evolve.

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In a way the formation of this group is not surprising as there is a growing list of companies who have their own support implementation of R that provides a number of additional and very important features. Most of these features evolve around making R more useable within applications and for easier production deployment.

Founding companies and organizations of the R Consortium include The R Foundation, Platinum members Microsoft and RStudio; Gold member TIBCO Software Inc.; and Silver members Alteryx, Google, HP, Mango Solutions, Ketchum Trading and Oracle.

It is important to note about this group is that they won't be looking at the R language but will be looking at the infrastructure that supports R.

The big boys are now onboard and promoting R and it will be interesting to see what directions they will come up with.

This is something worth keeping an eye on.

Friday, July 17, 2015

UKOUG Tech 15 : Acceptances & Agenda

Just over a week ago the Acceptance emails started to go out for the UKOUG TECH15 and APPS15 conferences. Also at this time the rejection emails started to go out too :-(

I was on the receiving end of both of these type of emails.

But I was delighted with the news that I received.

My topic areas crosses the TECH and APPs topics and also crosses the Business Analytics stream which looks to bridge this divide in the world of Business Intelligence.

So in December I will be giving the following presentations.

Sunday 6th : Super Sunday event : Business Analytics Stream

12:30 - 14:30 : (2 hours) : Predictive Analytics in Oracle: Mining the Gold & Creating Valuable Products


I'll be giving away a copy of my book on Oralce Data Mining to one lucky attendee at this Super Sunday session.


Monday 7th : 9:00-9:50 : Analytics Stream

Is Oracle the Best Language for Statistics


Wednesday 9th : 14:30-15:20 : Big Data & Data Warehousing Stream (TECH 15 & APPS15)

Automating Predictive Analytics in Your Applications


Check out the full agendas for TECH 15 and APPS15 by clicking on appropriate image below.

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Go Register for these events now!

Wednesday, July 15, 2015

Charting Number of R Packages over time (Part 1)

This is the first of a three part blog post on charting and analysing the number of R package submissions.

(I will update this blog post with links to the other two posts as they come available)

I'm sure most of you have heard of the R programming language. If not then perhaps it is something that you might want to go off an learn a bit about. Why? well it is one of the most popular languages for performing various types of statistics, advanced topics on statistics and machine learning and for generating lots of cool looking graphs.

If this is not something that you might be interested then it is time to go to another website/blog.

In this blog post I'm going to chart the number of packages submitted to R and are available for download and installation.

Why am I doing this? I got bored one day after coming back from my vacation and I though it would be a useful thing to do. Then after doing this I decided to use these graphs somewhere else, but you will have to wait until 2016 to find out!

The R website has a listing of all the packages and the dates that they were submitted.

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There are a variety of tools available that you can use to extract the information on this webpage and there are lots of examples or R code too. I'll leave that as a little exercise for you to do.

I extracted all of this information and stored it in a table in my Oracle Database (of course I did as I work with Oracle databases day in day out). This will allow me to easily reuse this data whenever I need it plus I can update this table with new packages from time to time.

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The following R code:

  1. Setups up and ROracle connection to my schema in my database
  2. Connects to the database
  3. Setups up a query to extract the data from the table
  4. Fetches this data into an R data frame called data
  5. Reformat the date columns to remove the time element to it
  6. Plot the data
library(ROracle)

drv <- dbDriver("Oracle")
# Create the connection string
host <- "localhost"
port <- 1521
service <- "pdb12c"
connect.string <- paste(
  "(DESCRIPTION=",
  "(ADDRESS=(PROTOCOL=tcp)(HOST=", host, ")(PORT=", port, "))",
  "(CONNECT_DATA=(SERVICE_NAME=", service, ")))", sep = "")

con <- dbConnect(drv, username = "brendan", password = "brendan",dbname=connect.string)

res<-dbSendQuery(con, "select r_date, count(*) r_num from r_packages
                       group by r_date order by 1 asc")
data <- fetch(res)

rdate<- data$R_DATE
rdate2<-as.Date(rdate,"%d/%m/%y")

plot(data$R_NUM~rdate2, data, type="l" , xaxt="n")
axis(1, rdate2, format(rdate2, "%b %y"), cex.axis=.7, las=1)

After I run the above code I get the following plot.

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(Yes I could have done a better job on laying out the chart with all sorts of labels and colors etc)

This chart gives us a plot of the number of new submissions by day.

There are 2 very obvious things that stand out from this graph. The easiest one to deal with is that we can see that there has been substantical growth in new submissions over the past 3 years. Perhaps we need to examine these a bit closer and when you do you will find that a lot of these are existing packages that have been resubmitted with updates.

There is a very obvious peak just over half ways along the chart. We really need to investigate this to understand what has happended. This peak occurs on the 29th October 2012. What happened on the 29th October 2012 as this is clearly an anomaly with the rest of the data. Well on this date R version 2.15.2 was release and a there was a lot of update pagackes got resubmitted.

Check out my next two blog posts were I will explore this data in a bit more detail.

(I will update this blog post with links to the other two posts as they come available)

Monday, July 13, 2015

V506 of Oracle OBIEE SampleApp Virtual Machine

A few days ago Oracle released the latest version of the Virtual Machine for OBIEE SampleApp. The current version has a number of new features and new product versions (see below).

To get this latest version go to the following link to download the VM files and to install. As always this is a beast of a VM and you should only consider the install and setup if you have the space and in particular you have 16G RAM.

Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition Samples on OTN.

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v506 New Features

  • DB 12.1.0.2 with the In-Memory option
  • Load and process JSON data
  • Integrates with Big Data SQL
  • Connects to Impala
  • Session tracking in UT
  • Exalytics Aggregation Functions
  • Lots of new Visualizations
  • Custom Style Features
  • Hierarchical Session Variables
  • etc.

Software on V506

  • Oracle Enterprise Linux 6.5 x64
  • OBIEE 11.1.1.9GA two distinct OBIEE instances, Essbase 11.1.2.4, updated BIMAD
  • Oracle MapViewer11.1.1.9.1
  • Oracle BICS Data Sync v1
  • Oracle Database 12c IMDB 12.1.0.2, PDB Install, AWM 12.1.0.2a, APEX 4.2.6 & ORDS 2.0.1, ODM, Oracle Spatial and Graph
  • ORE 1.4.1 & R 3.1.1
  • ENDECA 3.1, Server 7.6.1, Studio 3.1, Provisioning Services
  • Cloudera CDH 5.1.2, Oracle BigData SQL, Oracle BigData Connectors
  • Plug and Play Companions : EPM 11.1.2.3, BIApps Demos
  • Utils: Start scripts, MapBuilder, SQLDev 4.1
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Thursday, July 9, 2015

Oracle Architect's Guides to Big Data

Over the past couple of years we have had a lot of information about Big Data presented to us. But one of the things that still stands out is that there is still a bit of confusion on what Big Data is. Depending on who you are talking to you will get a different definition and interpretation of what Big Data is and what you can do with it.

For example there is one company I know of who are talking about their Big Data project. For them this involves processing approx. 1 million records. That is Big for them. For others that is tiny.

Oracle has recently put together a series of articles that talk about what architectural changes are needed to your technical infrastructure to support Big Data. In this case it is more about the volume of data rather than different types of data. Although this is covered by the architecture that Oracle gives.

As part of the Oracle Enterprise Architecture section of the Oracle website, they have put together a series of articles on how you can include Big Data within your Enterprise Information Architecture.

These are a good read and a great place to get a better understanding of what you need to be considering as you move to an architecture that includes Big Data.

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Wednesday, July 1, 2015

Extending vmdk Size for VirtualBox VM

Recently I ran out of space on one of my Windows virtual machines. I needed to increase the size of the disk to allow me to install some new software. When creating the VM I had created the disks as VMDK. Yes I know now that is not the best format to use :-( VMDK disks/files do not allow you to dynamically change their size :-( So what can you do? Is it possible in any way? If so how? Well this is what I did (after a bit of research using the google and StackOverFlow.
  1. Make a copy of the vmdk file on the OS. Just in case anything happens! (always have a backup)
  2. Clone the vmdk disk file into vdi format. To do this you need to use the VBoxManage command/app to clone the file into a vdi formatted file. For example this is what I ran.

    VBoxManage clonehd "Win7-11.2.0.3-ORE-03-Jan-14-disk1.vmdk" "cloned.vdi" --format vdi

  3. There was some suggestions that you could then clone the vdi file back into vmdk format. This did not work for me. It kept on giving me errors when the cloning process was nearly finished. After a bit of time researching this I wasn't able to find a solution to fix this. Instead I did the following
  4. Replace the vodka disk/file with the vdi disk/file in my VirtualBox VM. Open VirtualBox, select the VM and then click on the Storage section. In this I was able to add the new vdi disk/file and then removed the old vodka disk/file.

    NewImage

  5. Start up the VM. The VM starts up as normal and everything works OK.
  6. To allocate and make the extract space useable you need to allocated the new space to the c:\ drive. To do this I did the following:
  7. Click on Start Button, then right click on Computer and select Manage from the drop down menu.
  8. In the Computer Management console select Disk Management. A screen something like the following appears shows the amount of allocated and unallocated disk.

    NewImage

  9. Right click on the area for the c:\ drive and select Extend Volume from the drop down menu.
  10. Select all the defaults are you go through the Wizard to Extend the Volume. When you are finished the c:\ drive will be extended with all the extra space, as shown below.

    NewImage

  11. All done. You now have a larger disk/drive for your Windows VM.

Tuesday, June 23, 2015

Oracle Magazine - March/April 2001

The headline articles of Oracle Magazine for March/April 2001 were on using Oracle 9i Application server to deliver e-business and web based applications. There was some case studies of companies using this technologies including Tantalus Communications, Digital River Commerce System, Tomatoland.com and Oracle themselves.


OM 2001 March April

Other articles included:

  • Tom Kyte's column looked at tips on automation, cleanup and database maintenance. Some of the details included index rebuilds, indexing interMedia files, killing and cleaning up sessions, how to specify the column at runtime in an order by, and how to use DBMS_JOB for database maintenance.
  • Oracle announces the release of PORTAL.ORACLE.COM and MY.ORACLE.COM.
  • Fre Sansmark has an article on Database Benchmarking and discusses what it means and how well they address real-world performance questions.
  • Understanding XML Standards gives a brief introduction to what XML is about, explains the three layers of XML Grammar, XML based Protocols and XML Vocabularies. .
  • Part 3 of 'Exploring Oracle Text Basics' looks at text searching and comparisons, creating, indexing and loading data.
  • Creating Updatable Views explores the various requirements for creating an View that can be used to update data that is based on a single table or based on the joining of multiple tables..
  • Linking to Remote Databases explores the basics of Database Links and that the DBA needs to know to setup and manages these..
  • Steven Feuerstein's article looks at Advanced Native Dynamic SQL and the use of bind variables and their limitations.

To view the cover page and the table of contents click on the image at the top of this post or click here.

My Oracle Magazine Collection can be found here. You will find links to my blog posts on previous editions and a PDF for the very first Oracle Magazine from June 1987.

Monday, June 8, 2015

Blogger vs WordPress Evaluation

I have my blog (come website) on the go for a few years now. It all started out as a notebook really for myself and a way of recording certain things so that I could find them easily later.
Over time it has developed into some more that that and it now covers a number of technical how-to type of articles and some of my Oracle User Group (and ACE Director) activities.
It all started out on Blogger that is provided by Google. I've found Blogger really easy to use and to configure into getting something that is semi professional looking (at least it does to me).
All of this happened before WordPress really got going. I've had a look at WordPress from time to time over the years but never really invested enough time into it. Despite, what feels like everyone, saying that WordPress was the bees knees.
About 6 weeks ago I decided to put some solid time into investigating WordPress (about time some of you might say). The challenge for me was how easy would it be to replicate what I had on my blogger hosted website onto WordPress. I have to say it was easy enough.
Now I have 2 blogs / website running in parallel. Currently my blog/website is hosted on Blogger can it can be accessed via my custom domain of www.oralytics.com. The WordPress blog/website can be accessed at oralytics.wordpress.com
As you will see they are very similar to each other. Yes there are some cosmetic differences but all the content is the same.
What I'm going to do is to run these two environments in parallel for the next (maybe) 6 to 8 weeks. At some point I will switch over my domain name (www.oralytics.com) to point at the WordPress site. And then I might switch it back.
The big question for me to answer is to which one of these 2 environments will become my main site.
Blogger is FREE.
WordPress is FREE, well it is if I use the WordPress.com site.
But if I use the WordPress.com site then I get this annoying banner at the bottom of the browser window that does some advertising for WordPress and the Theme that I'm using.
The alternative to this where I do not get any of these adverts appearing is to pay for Hosting and to pay for a theme. Over a 3 year period that comes out at about $300+. The cheapest WordPress hosting that I could find, at the moment, is with GoDaddy.
What do you think I should do?
1. Stay with what I have on Blogger (www.oralytics.com) (Free)
2. Switch to the Free WordPress.com option (oralytics.wordpress.com) (Free)
3. Buy WordPress hosting and pay for a theme. (Costs $)
When I put out my original enquiry a few weeks ago lots of people came back with really good advice. In particular I wanted to mention Jeff Smyth, Tim Hall and Martin Widlake for the advice, help and suggestions, which I think lots of others found very useful.

Wednesday, June 3, 2015

PMML in Oracle Data Mining

PMML (Predictive Model Markup Langauge) is an XML formatted output that defines the core elements and settings for your Predictive Models. This XML formatted output can be used to migrate your models from one data mining or predictive modelling tool to another data mining or predictive modelling tool, such as Oracle.

Using PMML to migrate your models from one tool to another allows for you to use the most appropriate tools for developing your models and then allows them to be imported into another tool that will be used for deploying your predictive models in batch or real-time mode. In particular the ability to use your Predictive Model within your everyday applications enables you to work in the area of Automatic or Prescriptive Analytics. Oracle Data Mining and the Oracle Database are ideal or even the best possible tools to allow for Automatic and Prescriptive Analytics for your transa

PMML is an XML based standard specified by the Data Mining Group

Oracle Data Mining supports the importing of PMML models that are compliant with version 3.1 of the standard and for Regression Models only. The regression models can be for linear regression or binary logistic regression.

The Data Mining Group Archive webpage have a number of sample PMML files for you to download and then to load into your Oracle database.

To Load the PMML file into your Oracle Database you can use the DBMS_DATA_MINING.IMPORT_MODEL function. I’ve given examples of how you can use this function to import an Oracle Data Mining model that was exported using the EXPORT_MODEL function.

The syntax of the IMPORT_MODEL function when importing a PMML file is the following

DBMS_DATA_MINING.IMPORT_MODEL (
      model_name        IN  VARCHAR2,
      pmmldoc           IN  XMLTYPE
      strict_check      IN  BOOLEAN DEFAULT FALSE);

The following example shows how you can load the version 3.1 Logistic Regression PMML file from the Data Mining Group archive webpage

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BEGIN    
   dbms_data_mining.IMPORT_MODEL (‘PMML_MODEL',
        XMLType (bfilename (‘IMPORT_DIR', 'sas_3.1_iris_logistic_reg.xml'),
          nls_charset_id ('AL32UTF8')
        ));
END;

 

This example uses the default value for STRICT_CHECK as FALASE. In this case if there are any errors in the PMML structure then these will be ignored and the imported model may contain “features” that may make it perform in a slightly odd manner.